Barley Soup with Mushroom and Kale

An instant classic, revisited! A Barley Soup with Mushroom and Kale is so comforting in the fall. There’s something about the earthiness of mushrooms that seems to keep me grounded, especially during the change of seasons. Their combination with barley and kale is a satisfying one. This soup, served with baguette, makes for a stunning weekday meal, with some leftovers as a bonus.

You could make this soup with hulled barley, which is more nutritious, as only its indigestible outer husk has been removed. Pearl barley, on the other end, has had its outer husk and bran layer removed, and has been polished. All this processing removes some of the grain’s nutrients. To make this soup with hulled barley, you may simply follow the recipe, but adjust the cooking time. Hulled barley will take closer to 45-60 minutes, maybe more. Just make sure you keep checking it for doneness and for liquid level. If you have time, it is totally worth it. Hulled barley is chewy, nutty and a great substitute for white rice.

Barley is a member of the grass family. The grain grows nicely in temperate climates around the world. It is said to be one of the first domesticated grains in the Fertile Crescent, appearing around the same time as einkorn and emmer wheat. Wild barley, its ancestor, ranges from North Africa and Crête in the west, to Tibet in the east. The earliest evidence of wild barley from an archaeological perspective dates back from 8500 BCE. Barley is today one of the world’s most important crops. In 2017, it was ranked fourth in the list of grains most produced, behind maize, rice and wheat. The world produces 149 million tonnes of barley, with Russia as the leading producer with 14% of the shares.

If you have not tried barley, I invite you to do so. This Barley Soup with Mushroom and Kale is actually a great way to try barley for the first time. The grain is a good source of essential nutrients, including fiber, vitamin B, niacin and dietary minerals like iron and manganese. It is important to note that like wheat, rye and their derivatives, barley contains gluten and may not be suitable for someone with gluten intolerance. It has been reported, however, that some people with wheat allergies can tolerate barley.

For other soup recipes using whole grains, check out this Spiced Green Cabbage and Kamut Soup and this Kamut Berry, Kidney Bean, and Shiitake Mushroom Soup.

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Barley Soup with Mushroom and Kale

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 40 minutes
  • Total Time: 50 minutes
  • Yield: 46 servings 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 3 teaspoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced, divided
  • 1 cup tomatoes, chopped
  • 8 cups mushroom stock or vegetable broth
  • 1 bouquet garni (tarragon, thyme, parsley all tied in a small bouquet with kitchen twine)
  • 1 cup pearl barley, rinsed
  • 8 ounces white or button mushrooms, sliced thin
  • 1 bunch kale, sliced thin
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons tamari, divided
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, minced

Instructions

In a large soup pot, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion, celery and 4 cloves of garlic. Sauté, stirring often, until onion is translucent and starts to brown, 6-7 minutes.

Add the tomatoes and sauté until saucy, about 5-6 minutes. Add the mushroom stock , the bouquet garni, and the barley. Bring to a boil, turn the heat down, cover and let cook for 35 minutes or more, until the barley is tender with a chewy center.

While the barley is cooking, heat 1 teaspoon olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and sauté until browned, 6-7 minutes. Add the leftover 2 cloves minced garlic and sauté for one more minute. Deglaze with the rice vinegar, add 1 tablespoon tamari and scrape up any brown bits at the bottom of the skillet. Remove from the heat.

When the barley is done, add the mushrooms, the kale, the parsley and 1 tablespoon tamari. Heat through until the kale is wilted. Remove the bouquet garni, taste and adjust seasonings. Bon appétit!

Keywords: barley, mushroom, kale, soup

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Soupe orge, kale et champignons

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 40 minutes
  • Total Time: 50 minutes
  • Yield: 4 à 6 portions 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 3 c. à thé huile d’olive, séparées
  • 1 oignon, haché
  • 2 branches de céleri, hachées
  • 6 gousses d’ail, émincées, séparées
  • 1 tasses de tomates, hachées
  • 8 tasses de bouillon de champignons ou de légumes
  • 1 bouquet garni (branches d’estragon, de thym et de persil, par exemple, liées par une ficelle de cuisine)
  • 1 tasse d’orge perlée, rinsée
  • 8 onces de champignons blancs ou café, tranchés mince
  • 1 botte de chou kale, tranché mince
  • 1 c. à soupe de vinaigre de riz
  • 2 c. à soupe de tamari, séparées
  • 2 c. à soupe de persil frais, haché

Instructions

Dans un grand chaudron à soupe, chauffer 2 c. à thé d’huile d’olive à feu moyen. Ajouter les oignons, le céleri, et 4 gousses d’ail émincées. Faire revenir, en brassant souvent, jusqu’à ce que l’oignon soit translucide et commence à dorer, environ 6 à 7 minutes.

Ajouter les tomates et faire revenir jusqu’à ce que le mélange soit en sauce, de 5 à 6 minutes. Ajouter le bouillon de champignons ou de légumes, le bouquet garni et l’orge. Bien mélanger et porter à ébullition. Réduire le feu, couvrir et cuire pendant 35 minutes ou plus, jusqu’à ce que l’orge soit tendre.

Pendant la cuisson de l’orge, chauffer 1 c. à thé d’huile d’olive dans une poêle à feu moyen-élevé. Ajouter les champignons et faire revenir jusqu’à ce qu’ils soient dorés, de 6 à 7 minutes. Déglacer avec le vinaigre de riz. Ajouter 1 c. à soupe de sauce tamari et gratter le fond de la poêle pour en déloger les sucs de cuisson. Retirer du feu.

Quand l’orge est cuite, ajouter les champignons cuits, le chou kale, le persil et 1 c. à soupe de sauce tamari. Retirer le bouquet garni, goûter et ajuster les assaisonnements. Bon appétit!

Keywords: orge, champignon, kale, soupe

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Lentil, Quinoa and Raspberry Salad

When it comes down to nutrition, lentils and quinoa are without a doubt nutrient-dense food items. A simple bowl of this Lentils, Quinoa and Raspberry Salad will keep you satisfied and will honestly make your taste buds dance. I wanted to develop a sturdy salad that would make use of some wonderful raspberry vinegar I received from my friend Jamila. Her aunt and uncle own La Belle Excuse, an olive producer with olive groves in Greece. They also offer many other pantry items, like delicious vinegars, sea salt, and confitures. So here we are, experimenting with the freshness of the raspberries against the sturdiness of the lentils and quinoa. It’s a gorgeous mix!

For other recipes of salads including fruits, check out the Livity Mango Salad and this fabulous Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette.

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Lentil, Quinoa and Raspberry Salad

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Yield: 23 servings 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1/2 cup lentils, cooked according to package directions
  • 1/2 cup quinoa, cooked according to package directions
  • 1 container fresh raspberries, washed
  • 1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
  • 1/4 cup shallots, minced
  • Mixed sprouts or microgreens
  • 34 tablespoons raspberry vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons maple syrup
  • Sea salt and pepper, to taste

Instructions

In a large mixing bowl, place the lentils, quinoa, raspberries, almonds, shallots and sprouts. In a small bowl, mix the raspberry vinegar, olive oil, maple syrup, and sea salt and pepper. Mix well. Add to the salad and mix delicately. Adjust seasonings and serve. Bon appétit!

Keywords: quinoa, lentils, raspberry

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Salade de lentilles, quinoa et framboises

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Yield: 23 portions 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1/2 tasse lentilles, cuites selon les directives sur l’emballage
  • 1/2 tasse quinoa, cuit selon les directives sur l’emballage
  • 1 contenant de framboises fraîches, lavées
  • 1/4 tasse d’amandes tranchées, grillées
  • 1/4 tasse d’échalote française, émincée
  • Micro-pousses
  • 3 à 4 c. à soupe de vinaigre de framboise
  • 3 c. à soupe d’huile d’olive
  • 2 c. à thé de sirop d’érable
  • Sel de mer et poivre, au goût

Instructions

Dans un grand bol, mélanger les lentilles, le quinoa, les framboises, les amandes, les échalotes françaises et les micro-pousses. Dans un petit bol, mélanger le vinaigre de framboises, l’huile d’olive, le sirop d’érable, et le sel de mer et poivre. Bien mélanger et verser sur la salade. Mélanger et ajuster les assaisonnements. Bon appétit!

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Wild Rice with Artichokes and Chickpeas

What to do with a can of artichoke hearts? I like to eat them just as they are, however, when you want to make a full meal with them, this Wild Rice with Artichokes and Chickpeas is absolutely stellar and uses ingredients that you might already have at home.

Wild rice is one of my absolute favorite ingredients. In Ojibwe, a North American indigenous language from the Algonquin family, wild rice is called manoomin, loosely translated to “harvesting berry”. Unlike what many people think, manoomin is not related to domesticated rice. It is in fact a species of grass, from the genus Zizania. The wild rice grains have a chewy outer coat and a tender inner core. The plants is grown in shallow water of small lakes or quiet streams, where sometimes only the head of the plant rises above the water. It is a great source of food for aquatic wildlife. It is important to note that many Native American tribes consider wild rice to be a sacred component of their culture.

Wild rice is also quite high in protein, the amino acid acidlysine and fiber. The grain actually comes a close second, after oats, for their protein content per calorie. Just like common rice, wild rice doesn’t contain gluten, which makes it a great alternative for people with intolerance. It is also important to note that the grain provides significant amounts of thiamin, riboflavin, iron and potassium. A cup of wild rice also provides 15% of the recommended daily value in zinc and over 20% in manganese.

Try this Wild Rice with Artichokes and Chickpeas today and let me know how you like it! And for more recipes using wild rice, check out this Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette and this Wild Rice with Sautéed Mushrooms.

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Wild Rice with Artichokes and Chickpeas

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 40 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 cup wild rice, rinsed and drained
  • 4 cups vegetable broth or water
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 1 can artichoke hearts, rinsed, drained, and quartered
  • 1 1/2 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 2 tablespoons sunflower seeds, toasted
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Sea salt, to taste

Instructions

In a medium saucepan, bring the vegetable broth (or water) and wild rice to a boil, over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer until the rice is cooked, about 40-45 minutes.

While the rice cooks, heat the olive oil in a large cast iron skillet. Add the chickpeas and sauté, over medium-high heat, for 10 minutes. Remove to a mixing bowl. In the same skillet, add a tad more oil and add the artichoke hearts, cut-side down. Sprinkle with some sea salt and cook a few minutes over medium-high heat, turning halfway, until edges start to brown, about 5-6 minutes total. Remove to the same mixing bowl as the chickpeas. In the same skillet, add the tomatoes, cut-side down. Let them sear nicely until they develop a nice char, then turn them. Sauté 2 minutes more then remove to the mixing bowl.

When the rice is cooked, drain, if necessary. Add to the mixing bowl. Add the sunflower seeds, the lemon juice, and some more sea salt, to taste. Bon appétit!

Keywords: wild rice, artichokes, tomatoes, chickpeas

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Riz sauvage aux pois chiches et artichauts

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 40 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 4 portions 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 tasse riz sauvage, rincé et égoutté
  • 4 tasses bouillon de légumes ou eau
  • 1 c. à soupe huile d’olive
  • 1 boîte de pois chiches, rincés et égouttés
  • 1 boîte de coeurs d’artichaut, rincés, égouttés et coupés en quartiers
  • 1 1/2 tasse de tomates cerises, coupées en deux
  • 2 c. à soupe de graines de tournesol, grillées
  • Jus de 1 citron
  • Sel de mer, au goût

Instructions

Dans une casserole moyenne, porter le bouillon de légumes et le riz sauvage à ébullition à feu moyen-élevé. Réduire le feu, couvrir et cuire jusqu’à ce que le riz soit tendre, environ 40 à 45 minutes.

Pendant ce temps, chauffer l’huile d’olive dans une poêle de fonte. Ajouter les pois chiches et faire revenir à feu moyen-élevé pendant 10 minutes, en remuant souvent. Transférer les pois chiches dans un grand bol à mélanger. Dans la même poêle, ajouter un trait d’huile d’olive. Ajouter les coeurs d’artichaut et faire revenir jusqu’à ce qu’ils commencent à dorer, environ 5 à 6 minutes, en les retournant à mi-chemin. Transférer dans le grand bol à mélanger avec les pois chiches. Dans la même poêle, ajouter les tomates, côté coupé vers le bas, et laisser cuire, sans déranger, pendant quelques minutes, jusqu’à ce qu’elles deviennent bien rôties. Retourner et cuire 2 minutes de plus. Transférer dans le bol à mélanger.

Lorsque le riz est cuit, égoutter si nécessaire. Ajouter au bol à mélanger. Ajouter les graines de tournesol, le jus de citron et du sel de mer, au goût. Bon appétit!

Keywords: riz sauvage, artichaut, pois chiches, tomates

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Kamut and Orange Salad

This Kamut and Orange Salad is built with a variety of textures, a deep vinaigrette and the chewy yumminess of the grain. Kamut is actually the commercial name for khorasan wheat, a grain that is nutty in taste and twice the size of common wheat grains. I like that it lends itself so nicely to warm and saucy salads like this one. Khorasan wheat contains more proteins, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and minerals than modern wheat. Please note that it is not gluten-free, as some people seem to think. I hope you enjoy this hearty salad as much as I did!

For another fabulous ‘salad-without-lettuce’ recipe, check out this Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette.

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Kamut and Orange Salad

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 50 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1/4 cup sliced almonds (or pumpkin seeds)
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 2 large fennel bulbs, quartered
  • 1 red onion, quartered
  • 1/4 cup olive oil, plus 2 teaspoons
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1 1/2 cup cooked Kamut (from 1/2 cup cooked according to package directions)
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • Juice and segments from 4 oranges (about 4 tablespoons juice)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh basil, chopped
  • Sea salt and pepper, to taste

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 320˚F (160˚C). Place the fennel, red onion and garlic cloves on a parchment-lined baking sheet and brush with the 2 teaspoons olive oil, and sprinkle generously with sea salt and pepper. Place in the oven and roast for 50-60 minutes, until the fennel is tender and caramelized. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. When cool enough to handle, slice all the vegetables thinly.

While the vegetables are roasting, in a small skillet, toast the almonds and fennel seeds while stirring, over medium-low heat, until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Set aside.

To assemble the salad, place the cooked Kamut, the roasted vegetables, the almonds and fennel seeds in a large bowl. Mix well. Top with the orange segments and juice, add the 1/4 cup olive oil, balsamic vinegar and basil. Season to taste with sea salt and pepper. Mix delicately. Bon appétit!

Keywords: fennel, kamut, wheat, salad

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Salade Kamut et Orange

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 50 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 4 portions 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1/4 tasse d’amandes tranchées (ou graines de citrouille)
  • 1 c. à thé de graines de fenouil
  • 2 gros bulbes de fenouil, en quartiers
  • 1 oignon rouge, en quartiers
  • 1/4 tasse d’huile d’olive, plus 2 c. à thé
  • 4 gousses d’ail, pelées
  • 1 1/2 tasse de Kamut cuit (cuire 1/2 tasse selon les directives sur la boîte)
  • 2 c. à soupe de vinaigre balsamique
  • Le jus et les suprêmes de 4 oranges (environ 4 c. à soupe de jus)
  • 2 c. à soupe de basilic frais, haché
  • Sel de mer et poivre, au goût

Instructions

Préchauffer le four à 320˚F (160˚C). Placer le fenouil, l’oignon rouge et les gousses d’ail sur une tôle de cuisson, préalablement recouverte de papier parchemin. Badigeonner des 2 c. à thé d’huile d’olive et assaisonner généreusement de sel de mer et de poivre. Mettre au four et cuire jusqu’à ce que le fenouil soit tendre et caramélisé, environ 50 à 60 minutes. Retirer du four et laisser refroidir quelque peu, avant de couper tous les légumes en minces tranches.

Pendant la cuisson des légumes, faire revenir les amandes et les graines de fenouil dans une petite poêle, à feu moyen-bas, pendant 2 à 3 minutes. Retirer du feu et laisser de côté.

Pour assembler la salade, placer le Kamut, les légumes rôtis, les amandes et graines de fenouil dans un grand bol. Mélanger. Ajouter les suprêmes d’orange et le jus d’orange. Ajouter 1/4 tasse d’huile d’olive, le vinaigre balsamique et le basilica frais. Assaisonner au goût de sel de mer et de poivre. Mélanger délicatement. Bon appétit!

Keywords: kamut, fenouil, orange, salade

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Israeli Couscous and Roasted Cauliflower with Tahini Sauce

Flavor level: 100!

This Israeli Couscous and Roasted Cauliflower with Tahini Sauce is exploding in textures. The tang of the tahini sauce with the chewy texture of the couscous makes this dish one to remember.

Israeli couscous, from its actual name ptitim, and sometimes referred to as pearl couscous, is said to have been created in the 1950s, during the austerity period in Israel, when rice supplies were scarce. Israel’s prime minister at the time requested that a wheat-based product be developed to be used as a substitute. Ptitim originally was made in the shape of rice, but inspired by couscous, the company started producing the small ball-shaped variety. Ptitim is made by extruding dough through a mold, cutting and toasting it, giving its distinct nutty flavor. It is versatile and can be used to replace pasta or rice in many instances. It is often prepared with fried onions or garlic, and vegetables or meat can be added.

In this recipe, we envelop the Israeli couscous and the deeply roasted cauliflower with tahini sauce. We then add some sautéed garlic and pine nuts, for an extra decadent warm dish that’ll blow your socks off. Yes, there are many little things to put together, but they can all be done while your cauliflower roasts. Try it and let me know what you think!

For another recipe using cauliflower and tahini, check this out: Cumin Roasted Cauliflower with Tahini Sauce.

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Israeli Couscous and Roasted Cauliflower with Tahini Sauce

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 35 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 46 servings 1x

Ingredients

Scale

For the Roasted Cauliflower

  • 1 large head of cauliflower, cut into small florets
  • 6 garlic cloves, peeled and left whole
  • 1 red bell pepper, sliced
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes (optional)
  • Sea salt and pepper

For the Israeli Couscous

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cups Israeli couscous
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt

For the Tahini Sauce

  • 1/3 cup tahini
  • 1/3 cup water
  • Juice of 1 juicy lemon
  • Sea salt and pepper, to taste
  • Extra lemon slices, to serve

For the Pine Nuts and Parsley

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped

Instructions

For the Roasted Cauliflower

Preheat oven to 425˚F (225˚C). On a parchment-lined baking sheet, toss together the cauliflower, garlic, red bell pepper slices, olive oil, red pepper flakes, if using, and sea salt and pepper, to taste. Place in the oven and roast for 30-35 minutes, tossing halfway through, until vegetables are charred in spots.

For the Israeli Couscous

In a skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the couscous and toast, stirring often, for 3 to 5 minutes.* In a medium saucepan, bring the water to a boil. Add the couscous and the salt. Return to a boil, reduce the heat, cover and cook until tender, about 15 minutes. Drain off any remaining water.

For the Tahini Sauce

Place all ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until smooth.

For the Pine Nuts and Parsley

Heat the olive oil in a small skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and the pine nuts and sauté, stirring often, until the garlic looses its bite and the pine nuts take on some color, about 3 to 5 minutes.

To assemble, toss together the roasted vegetables, the couscous and the pine nuts and parsley garnish. Add the tahini sauce and mix again. Serve with some lemon slices on the side. Bon appétit!

 

Notes

*This step is optional. It does, however, bring out the yummy nutty taste of the couscous.

Keywords: Israeli couscous, cauliflower, pine nuts, tahini

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Couscous israélien avec chou-fleur au four et sauce tahini

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 35 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 4 à 5 portions 1x

Ingredients

Scale

Pour le chou-fleur au four

  • 1 grosse tête de chou-fleur, coupée en petits fleurons
  • 6 gousses d’ail, pelées et entières
  • 1 poivron rouge, épépiné et coupé en lanières
  • 3 c. à soupe d’huile d’olive
  • Pincée de flocons de piments chili broyés (en option)
  • Sel de mer et poivre, au goût

Pour le couscous israélien

  • 2 c. à soupe d’huile d’olive
  • 2 tasse de couscous israélien
  • 3 tasses d’eau
  • 1 c. à thé de sel de mer

Pour la sauce tahini

  • 1/3 tasse de tahini
  • 1/3 tasse d’eau
  • Jus d’un demi citron bien juteux
  • Sel de mer et poivre, au goût
  • Tranches de citron, pour servir

Pour les noix de pins et le persil

  • 2 c. à soupe d’huile d’olive
  • 3 gousses d’ail, hachées
  • 1/4 tasse noix de pin
  • 1/4 tasse persil frais, haché

Instructions

Pour le chou-fleur au four

Préchauffer le four à 425˚F (225˚C). Sur une plaque de cuisson préalablement recouverte de papier parchemin, mélanger les fleurons de chou-fleur, les gousses d’ail, le poivron rouge, l’huile d’olive, les flocons de piments chili broyés, si désiré, et du sel de mer et poivre, au goût. Mettre au four et rôtir pendant 30 à 35 minutes, jusqu’à ce que les légumes soient bien dorés. Retourner les légumes autour de la mi-cuisson.

Pour le couscous israélien

Dans une poêle, chauffer l’huile d’olive à feu moyen. Ajouter le couscous israélien et faire sauter en brassant, de 3 à 5 minutes.* Dans un chaudron moyen, porter l’eau à ébullition. Ajouter le couscous israélien et le sel de mer. Porter de nouveau à ébullition, réduire le feu, couvrir et cuire jusqu’à ce que le couscous soit tendre, environ 15 minutes. Retirer du feu et égoutter, si nécessaire.

Pour la sauce tahini

Mettre tous les ingrédients dans un petit bol et fouetter jusqu’à l’obtention d’une consistence onctueuse.

Pour les noix de pin et le persil

Chauffer l’huile d’olive dans une petite poêle à feu moyen. Ajouter l’ail et les noix de pin. Faire revenir, en brassant souvent, environ 3 à 5 minutes.

Pour assembler, mélanger le chou-fleur, le couscous israélien, la garniture de noix de pin et persil. Arroser de la sauce tahini et mélanger à nouveau. Servir avec des tranches de citron frais. Bon appétit!

Notes

*Cette étape n’est pas essentielle, mais rehausse grandement le goût du couscous.

Keywords: couscous israélien, chou-fleur, noix de pin, tahini

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Teff Crêpes with Roasted Winter Squash and Herbs

These Teff Crêpes with Roasted Winter Squash and Herbs look so good, they’re perfect for company. But they’re also quick enough to make on a weeknight. Plus, they’re amazing as leftovers for lunch the next day.

Eragrostis tef, also known as teff, is a species of lovegrass native to the Horn of Africa, more specifically to modern-day Ethiopia. Some say it’s the smallest known grain. The plant is cultivated for its edible seeds, which are milled to make flour, mostly. Teff is used extensively in the cuisine of the Ethiopia and Eritrea. It comes in several varieties and colors, and it is the base for injera, the fermented sourdough flatbread that is eaten with most Ethiopian meals.

Although teff is gaining in popularity worldwide, like so many other ancestral food that are rooted in a nation’s culture and identity, it comes at a price. And in most cases, the nation where the food took root is the one paying for it. In the case of teff flour, in 2003 the Dutch company HPFI teamed up with the Ethiopian Institute of Biodiversity Conservation to introduce teff to markets across Europe. It was agreed that both parties would split profits. But the then CEO of HPFI, who had taken out two patents on teff, was now arguing that his way of milling and storing the flour was unique. The company declared bankruptcy in 2009, leaving the CEO the right to use the patents as well as all marketing rights. But there’s more. He also became free from the original agreement with Ethiopia.

Later on, the patent was declared void by the Dutch patent office, on the basis that the ways to bake and mix flours were ‘general professional knowledge’. Today, Ethiopia is looking to regain ownership over global markets of one of its most important food source.

I am grateful for the chance I have to use teff. I’m starting to play with it more and more. I love that it’s completely free of gluten and so versatile. These crêpes are nothing compared to the mighty injera, but they’re quick, satisfying, gluten-free, and healthy. Let me know what you think!

You can find other great winter squash recipes here: Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette and Roasted Spaghetti Squash with Spinach and Cherry Tomatoes

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Teff Crêpes with Roasted Winter Squash and Herbs

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 35 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x

Ingredients

Scale

Crêpes

  • 1 cup teff flour (you may ground whole teff to a flour using a blender or food processor)
  • 2 tablespoons flax meal
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon oil, to oil the cooking pan

Filling

  • 2 lbs winter squash, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1/2 cup walnuts, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 heaping teaspoons fresh sage, chopped
  • 2 heaping teaspoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped
  • 2 heaping tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
  • Optional: Tahini sauce made by mixing 1/4 cup tahini, 1/4 cup water and the juice of half a juicy lemon, sea salt and pepper
  • Optional: toasted pumpkin seeds

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 375˚F. Place the squash cubes in a large bowl. Add 1 tablespoon of olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon sea salt and some pepper. Mix well and arrange in a single layer on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Roast until the squash is tender and browned in parts, about 35-40 minutes, giving them a shake every 10 minutes or so.

While the squash roasts, prepare the crêpe batter. In a high speed blender, place 1 cup teff flour, the flax meal, salt and 1 1/2 cup water. Blend on high until a thick and smooth batter forms. Set aside.

Going back to the filling, in a small skillet, add 2 tablespoons olive oil and heat over medium heat. Add the walnuts, garlic, sage, and rosemary and cook just enough for the garlic to loose its bite, about a minute. Remove from the heat and add the parsley. When the squash is done, mix in the walnuts and herbs mixture.

To cook the crêpes, warm a small non-stick skillet over medium heat. Using a paper towel and small amount of oil, grease the bottom of the skillet. Once the skillet is hot, pour in 1/4 cup of the batter, gently rotating it so that it distributes it evenly. Cook without touching about 3 minutes or until the edges become crisp and start to peel away from the skillet. If you flip too soon, it will stick. You may need to play with the level of heat to find the sweet spot. Flip the crêpe and cook the other side for 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to a platter and keep warm with a clean kitchen towel. Repeat with the remaining batter.

To serve, top each crêpe with some squash mixture. Top with some tahini sauce and toasted pumpkins seeds, if desired. Bon appétit!

Keywords: teff, crêpes, squash

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Crêpes de teff avec courge d’hiver rôtie aux herbes

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 35 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 4 portions 1x

Ingredients

Scale

Crêpes

  • 1 tasse de farine de teff (vous pouvez faire la farine vous-mêmes en pulsant le grain dans un mélangeur)
  • 2 c. à soupe de graine de lin moulue
  • 1/4 c. à thé de sel
  • 1 1/2 tasse d’eau
  • 1 c. à thé d’huile, pour graisser la poêle

Garniture

  • 2 livres (1 kg) de courge d’hiver au choix, pelée et coupée en cubes de 1 po (2,5cm)
  • 3 c. à soupe d’huile d’olive
  • 1/2 tasse de noix, hachées finement
  • 2 gousses d’ail, émincées
  • 2 généreuses c. à thé de sauge fraîche, hachée
  • 2 généreuses c. à thé de romarin frais, haché finement
  • 2 c. à soupe de persil frais, haché
  • En option: sauce tahini simple (1/4 tasse tahini, 1/4 tasse d’eau et le jus d’un demi citron bien juteux, sel de mer et poivre)
  • En option: graines de citrouille grillées

Instructions

Préchauffer le four à 375˚F (190˚C). Dans un grand bol, mélanger les cubes de courge, 1 c. à soupe d’huile d’olive, 1/2 c. à thé de sel de mer et du poivre. Placer sur une tôle préalablement recouverte de papier parchemin et mettre au four. Cuire pendant 35 à 40 minutes, jusqu’à ce que les cubes soient tendres et bien rôtis par endroits, en les retournant toutes les 10 minutes.

Pendant que la courge cuit, préparer le mélange à crêpes. Dans un mélangeur, placer 1 tasse de farine de teff, la graine de lin moulue, le sel et 1 1/2 tasse d’eau. Mélanger jusqu’à l’obtention d’un mélange épais et onctueux. Réserver.

Dans une petite poêle, faire chauffer 2 c. à soupe d’huile d’olive à feu moyen. Ajouter les noix hachées, l’ail, la sauge et le romarin. Cuire, en brassant, pendant 2 minutes. Retirer du feu, ajouter le persil et mélanger avec les cubes de courge rôtis.

Pour faire les crêpes, chauffer une poêle anti-adhésive à feu moyen. À l’aide d’un papier absorbant et d’une petite quantité d’huile, graisser le fond de la poêle. Une fois que la poêle est chaude, verser 1/4 tasse de mélange à crêpe. Tourner et retourner la poêle afin d’y distribuer le mélange uniformément. Cuire sans déranger pendant 3 minutes, jusqu’à ce que les rebords de la crêpe deviennent croustillants et qu’ils se détachent légèrement de la poêle. Résister l’envie de tourner la crêpe trop tôt pour éviter qu’elle ne colle. Ajuster le degré de chaleur, si nécessaire. Retourner la crêpe et cuire pour 1 à 2 minutes de plus. Retirer la crêpe et déposer sur une assiette recouverte d’un linge propre, pour garder au chaud. Répéter avec le reste du mélange.

Pour servir, garnir chaque crêpe du mélange de courge. Garnir de sauce tahini et de graines de citrouille, si désiré. Bon appétit!

Keywords: teff, crêpes, courge

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Root Vegetable Risotto

This Root Vegetable Risotto is easy to make and will make you discover or use vegetables you’re not too acquainted with. We use parsnips, turnips, celery root and carrots, all shredded, and get to a vibrant, yet totally grounding vibe. One bite of this risotto and you’ll be thinking of a whole heap of ways to transform the recipe with the seasons.

If you love recipes using rice, check out this fabulous Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette. It will truly bring the flavors of the season, with the squash and the pomegranates.

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Root Vegetable Risotto

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 25 minutes
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x
  • Method: Stovetop

Ingredients

Scale
  • 5 cups vegetable stock
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 cup carrots, grated
  • 1/2 cup turnips, grated
  • 1/2 cup parsnip, grated
  • 1/2 cup celery root, grated
  • 1 cup arborio rice, rinsed and drained
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • Black pepper, to taste
  • Fresh parsley, minced, for garnish

Instructions

Pour the vegetable stock in a saucepan and bring to a light simmer. Heat the olive oil in a heavy saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and sea salt and cook, stirring, until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the carrots, turnips, parsnips, and celery root. Cook for an additional 3-4 minutes. Add the arborio rice, tomato paste, ginger, and garlic and cook while stirring for 2 minutes, until the tomato paste is getting darker and fragrant.

Add 1 cup of the stock and stir, adjusting the heat to ensure the rice simmers nicely. Keep cooking and stirring until the stock has been absorbed. Keep adding stock with a ladle, about 1/2 cup at a time, and stir while cooking until each addition is absorbed. Repeat this process until the rice is tender but still has a bite. The whole cooking process should take about 25-30 minutes.

Once cooked, stir in the butter and season generously with pepper. Serve garnished with fresh parsley. Bon appétit!

Keywords: risotto, root vegetable, rice

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Risotto aux légumes racines

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 25 minutes
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 4 portions 1x
  • Method: Sur la cuisinière

Ingredients

Scale
  • 5 tasses de bouillon de légumes
  • 1 oignon, haché finement
  • 2 c. à soupe d’huile d’olive
  • 1 1/2 c. à thé de sel de mer
  • 1/2 tasse de carottes, râpées
  • 1/2 tasse de navet, râpé
  • 1/2 tasse de panais, râpé
  • 1/2 tasse de céleri-rave, râpé
  • 1 tasse de riz arborio, rincé et égoutté
  • 1 c. à soupe de pâte de tomate
  • 1 c. à soupe de gingembre frais, émincé
  • 2 gousses d’ail, émincées
  • 2 c. à soupe de beurre
  • Poivre noir, au goût
  • Persil frais, haché, pour la garniture

Instructions

Porter le bouillon de légumes à mijoter dans une casserole. Faire chauffer l’huile d’olive dans une autre casserole à feu moyen. Ajouter l’oignon et le sel de mer et cuire, en brassant quelques fois, jusqu’à ce que l’oignon soit tendre, environ 5 minutes. Ajouter les carottes, le navet, le panais et le céleri-rave. Cuire, en brassant quelques fois, pendant 3 à 4 minutes de plus. Ajouter le riz, la pâte de tomates, le gingembre et l’ail et cuire, tout en brassant, jusqu’à ce que l’arôme de la pâte de tomate se développe, environ 2 minutes.

Ajouter 1 tasse du bouillon de légumes et brasser, ajustant le feu afin de maintenir la cuisson du riz. Continuer de cuire, en brassant, jusqu’à ce que tout le bouillon soit absorbé. Continuer d’ajouter du bouillon, 1/2 tasse à la fois, et continuer de brasser jusqu’à absorption complète du bouillon avant chaque nouvel ajout. Répéter jusqu’à ce que le riz soit tendre. Le processus prendra environ 25 à 30 minutes.

Une fois cuit, ajouter le beurre et assaisonner généreusement de poivre. Servir garni de persil frais haché. Bon appétit!

Keywords: risotto, légumes racines, riz

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Raw Wild Rice Salad with Apple and Pomegranate

Raw Wild Rice Salad with Apple and Pomegranate
Raw Wild Rice Salad with Apple and Pomegranate

Do you know Aris Latham? He is the driving force behind SunFired Ra Cuisine. He is a great soul that truly inspires me, someone I consider a master when it comes to clean eating. In his ebook, SunFired – Festive Raw Food Recipes, Baba Aris instructs us to soak wild rice instead of cooking it. We let it bloom, which means we soak it for 24 hours, changing the water after 12 hours. The reason wild rice doesn’t need to be boiled is because it is actually a grass. Keeping it raw will therefore keep its nutrients. SunFired Food is the bountiful cuisine prepared by the best chef of all, the SUN. He adds: “The growing period is the cooking process… we do not cook the sun out of the food.” So yes, let’s explore!

For another wonderful recipe with wild rice, please check out this Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette.

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Raw Wild Rice Salad with Apple and Pomegranate

Raw Wild Rice Salad with Apple and Pomegranate
  • Author: Karine K
  • Method: No-cook
  • Cuisine: Raw

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 cup wild rice, soaked 24 hours total, changing the water after 12 hours
  • 1 cup pomegranate seeds
  • 1 apple, julienned
  • 1 tablespoon shallots, minced
  • 1/3 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1/8 teaspoon allspice
  • 1/4 cup almonds, chopped
  • Sea salt, to taste

Instructions

Rinse and drain the wild rice and place in a mixing bowl. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix well. Garnish with sea salt, to taste. Bon appétit!

Keywords: wild rice, apple, pomegranate

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Salade crudivore de riz sauvage avec pomme et pomme grenade

Raw Wild Rice Salad with Apple and Pomegranate
  • Author: Karine K
  • Method: Sans cuisson
  • Cuisine: Vivante

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 tasse de riz sauvage, trempé pendant 24 heures (il est important de rincer et de changer l’eau après 12 heures)
  • 1 tasse de graines de pomme grenade
  • 1 pomme, en juliennes
  • 1 c. à soupe d’échalote française, émincée
  • 1/3 tasse de jus d’orange frais
  • 1/8 c. à thé de piment de la Jamaïque
  • 1/4 tasse d’amandes, hachées
  • Sel de mer, au goût

Instructions

Rincer et égoutter le riz sauvage et placer dans un bol à mélanger. Ajouter le reste des ingrédients et assaisonner de sel de mer, au goût. Bon appétit!

Notes

Pour une salade complètement crudivore, il est important de faire tremper le riz sauvage pendant 24 heures, en changeant l’eau après 12 heures. 

Keywords: riz sauvage, pomme, pomme grenade

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Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette

Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette
Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette

This Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette is a treat. It’s sweet, tangy, chewy, and if you bring this to a family or friends reunion, you’ll become a star instantly! There are a few things to juggle here, but if you start your wild rice, you’ll be able to accomplish all the other tasks as it cooks, and you’ll be done in less than an hour. This stellar dish is complete and nutritious. Wild rice contains twice the protein found in white rice, several important nutrients, and a fabulous amount of antioxidants. You may use any winter squash you like in lieu of the acorn squash. Try it, it’s divine!

For other recipes using pomegranates, check out this Couscous with Dates, Pine Nuts and Pomegranate Vinaigrette and this Armenian-Spiced Stuffed Eggplant with Millet and Apricots.

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Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette

Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette
  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 45 minutes
  • Total Time: 55 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x

Ingredients

Scale

For the Wild Rice:

  • 1 cup wild rice, rinsed well and drained
  • 4 cups vegetable broth or water

For the Acorn Squash:

  • 2 acorn squash, peeled and cut into small cubes (or 1 butternut)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon maple
  • Sea salt and pepper, to taste

For the Caramelized Onions:

  • 1 large onion, sliced thin
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
  • Sea salt

For the Vinaigrette:

  • 1 teaspoon garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil
  • Sea salt and pepper, to taste

To Serve:

  • 1 cup pomegranate
  • Pumpkin seeds (totally optional)

Instructions

For the Wild Rice:

In a medium saucepan, bring the wild rice and the broth/water to a boil. Reduce the heat to obtain a simmer, cover and let cook approximately 45 minutes, until some grains start to burst open and the rice is still chewy. Drain and set aside.

For the Acorn Squash:

Preheat the oven to 400˚F (200˚C). In a mixing bowl, place the squash cubes, the olive oil, the maple, and some sea salt and pepper. Mix well with your hands and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Roast in the oven for 20-25 minutes, until tender and cooked through. Remove from oven and set aside.

For the Caramelized Onions:

Heat the olive oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes. You may need to adjust the heat. You want the onions to brown, but not burn. Add a sprinkle of sea salt, mix well and lower the heat a little. Cook for an additional 5-10 minutes, until the onions are soft and caramelized. Add the balsamic and the maple syrup, mix well and remove from the heat.

For the Maple Vinaigrette:

Whisk all ingredients together in a small bowl or shake in a mason jar.

To Serve:

Place the rice, the acorn squash, the caramelized onions, the vinaigrette and the pomegranate in a large mixing bowl and mix well. Remove to a serving platter and enjoy! Bon appétit!

Keywords: wild rice, squash, pomegranate, maple

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Riz sauvage avec courge poivrée, oignons caramélisés, pomme grenade et vinaigrette à l’érable

Wild Rice with Acorn Squash, Caramelized Onions, Pomegranate and Maple Vinaigrette
  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 45 minutes
  • Total Time: 55 minutes
  • Yield: 4 portions 1x

Ingredients

Scale

Pour le riz sauvage:

  • 1 tasse de riz sauvage, rincé et égoutté
  • 4 tasses de bouillon de légumes ou d’eau

Pour la courge poivrée:

  • 2 courge poivrée, pelée et coupée en petits cubes
  • 1 c. à soupe d’huile d’olive
  • 1 c. à soupe de sirop d’érable
  • Sel de mer et poivre, au goût

Pour les oignons caramélisés:

  • 1 gros oignon, tranché mince
  • 1 c. à thé d’huile d’olive
  • 1 c. à thé de vinaigre balsamique
  • 1 c. à thé de sirop d’érable
  • Sel de mer

Pour la vinaigrette:

  • 1 c. à thé d’ail émincé
  • 1/2 c. à thé de moutarde de Dijon
  • 2 c. à soupe de sirop d’érable
  • 2 c. à soupe de vinaigre de cidre de pomme
  • 1 c. à soupe de vinaigre de vin rouge
  • 6 c. à soupe d’huile d’olive
  • Sel de mer et poivre (1/2 c. à thé chacun)

Pour servir:

  • 1 tasse de graines de pomme grenade
  • Graines de citrouille (carrément optionnel)

Instructions

Pour le riz sauvage:

Dans une moyenne casserole, porter le riz et l’eau/le bouillon de légumes à ébullition, Réduire le feu, couvrir, et laisser mijoter pendant environ 45 minutes, jusqu’à ce que les grains commencent à éclore. Égoutter et réserver.

Pour la courge poivrée:

Préchauffer le four à 400˚F (200˚C). Dans un bol à mélanger, déposer les cubes de courge, l’huile d’olive, le sirop d’érable, et du sel de mer et poivre, au goût. Bien mélanger avec les mains et disposer sur une plaque de cuisson préalablement tapissée de papier parchemin. Cuire au four pendant 20 à 25 minutes jusqu’à ce que la courge soit tendre. Retirer du feu et réserver.

Pour les oignons caramélisés:

Chauffer l’huile d’olive dans une poêle à feu moyen-élevé. Ajouter les oignons et cuire, en brassant, pendant 5 minutes. Ajuster le feu afin d’assurer que les oignons ne collent pas. Les oignons doivent dorer, mais pas brûler. Ajouter une pincée de sel de mer, mélanger et réduire le feu. Cuire pendant 5 à 10 minutes, jusqu’à ce que les oignons soient tendres et caramélisés. Ajouter le vinaigre balsamique, le sirop d’érable et bien mélanger. Retirer du feu.

Pour la vinaigrette à l’érable:

Mélanger tous les ingrédients dans un petit bol ou dans un pot mason.

Pour servir:

Déposer le riz, la courge, les oignons caramélisés, la vinaigrette et les graines de pomme grenade dans un grand bol. Bien mélanger et déposer sur une assiette de service. Bon appétit!

Keywords: riz sauvage, courge, pomme grenade, érable

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Couscous with Dates, Pine Nuts and Pomegranate Vinaigrette

Dates and Pine Nuts Couscous with Pomegranate Vinaigrette
Dates and Pine Nuts Couscous with Pomegranate Vinaigrette

The joy of pomegranates when December rolls around! I love them in desserts and just as is, but I also love a good savory dish garnished with those juicy and tender arils. This stellar Couscous with Dates, Pine Nuts and Pomegranate Vinaigrette is quickly becoming a favorite in the family. It’s easy to put together, plus it’s sweet and delicious. If you can’t find pomegranate molasses at your local grocery store, the international market is a great place to look. Fetch the very best dates to take this dish to the next level.

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Couscous with Dates, Pine Nuts and Pomegranate Vinaigrette

Couscous with Dates, Pine Nuts and Pomegranate Vinaigrette
  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 7 minutes
  • Total Time: 12 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 teaspoon orange zest
  • 1/2 cup freshly squeezed orange juice, plus 4 tablespoons, divided
  • 1/8 teaspoon cardamom
  • 1 cup instant couscous
  • 2 tablespoons pomegranate molasses
  • 1 teaspoon, plus 1/4 cup olive oil, divided
  • 2 tablespoon fresh mint leaves, chopped
  • 1/2 cup dates, diced
  • 1/3 cup toasted pine nuts
  • 1/3 cup fresh scallions, sliced thin on the diagonal
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Garnishes: fresh mint leaves, orange slices, pomegranate arils

Instructions

In a medium saucepan, bring the water, 1/2 cup of orange juice, orange zest, cardamom and 1 teaspoon olive oil to a boil. Stir in couscous, stir, cover pan and remove from the heat. Let rest, covered, for 5 minutes.

In a small bowl, whisk together the 4 tablespoons of orange juice and pomegranate molasses. Add 1/4 cup olive oil while whisking. Fold in the chopped mint leaves. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Uncover the couscous and fluff with a fork. Place in a large mixing bowl. Add the dates and the vinaigrette and toss until well coated. Serve sprinkled with the pine nuts, the scallions, some fresh mint leaves, orange slices, and PLENTY of pomegranate seeds. Bon appétit!

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Couscous aux dates, noix de pin et pomme grenade

Couscous with Dates, Pine Nuts and Pomegranate Vinaigrette

Ah l’arrivée de décembre avec ses pommes grenade! Bien que je les adore fraîches ou en dessert, elles sont aussi fabuleuses comme garniture sur un bon plat de couscous. Cette recette est devenue une préférée à la maison. Si vous ne pouvez trouver de la mélasse de pomme grenade à votre supermarché, essayez dans un marché international. Et mettez la main sur les meilleures dates que vous pouvez trouver, les saveurs vous surprendront!

  • Author: Karine K
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 7 minutes
  • Total Time: 12 minutes
  • Yield: 4 portions 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1/2 tasse d’eau
  • 1/2 c. à thé de zeste d’orange
  • 1/2 tasse de jus d’orange fraîchement pressé, plus 4 c. à soupe, séparé
  • 1/8 c. à thé de cardamome
  • 1 tasse de couscous instantané
  • 2 c. à soupe de mélasse de pomme grenade
  • 1 c. à thé, plus 1/4 tasse d’huile d’olive, séparé
  • 2 c. à soupe de menthe fraîche, émincée
  • 1/2 tasse de dates, hachées
  • 1/3 tasse de noix de pin, rôties
  • 1/3 tasse d’oignons verts, émincés
  • Sel de mer et poivre, au goût
  • Garnitures: menthe fraîche, tranches d’orange, graines de pomme grenade

Instructions

Dans une casserole moyenne, porter à ébullition l’eau, la 1/2 tasse de jus d’orange, le zeste d’orange, la cardamome, et la c. à thé d’huile. Ajouter le couscous en remuant, couvrir et retirer du feu. Laisser reposer, couvert, pendant 5 minutes.

Dans un petit bol, fouetter les 4 c. à soupe de jus d’orange et la mélasse de pomme grenade. Ajouter 1/4 tasse d’huile d’olive, en fouettant. Ajouter les feuilles de menthe et assaisonner de sel de mer et de poivre.

Retirer le couvercle du couscous et défaire les grains à la fourchette. Placer dans un grand bol à mélanger, ajouter les dates, la vinaigrette et bien mélanger. Servir garni des noix de pin, des oignons verts, de menthe fraîche, de tranches d’orange, et de beaucoup de graines de pomme grenade. Bon appétit!

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